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Phil

"Ottawa, we (will) have a Metro!"

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Let's not take ourselves too seriously on this one...

Looking for articles written about the O-Train for other audiences, I stumbled upon one of those gems, well research and well written, from The Daily Hive, something you read when you live in Vancouver.

The article qualify the O-Train as a Metro, something I had not seen before.

Here it is : https://dailyhive.com/vancouver/confederation-line-ottawa-timelapse-video

It appears that the difference between Light Rail and Metro has very little to do with the size of the cars nor the length of the trains.

Wikipedia :

"The International Association of Public Transport (L'Union Internationale des Transports Publics, or UITP) defines metro systems as urban passenger transport systems, "operated on their own right of way and segregated from general road and pedestrian traffic".

The article is here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_metro_systems

I am sure there could be other definitions, but the organization that is mentioned in the article seems to have authority on the matter.

The list includes as metros the Toronto Subway, the Montréal Métro, and the Vancouver SkyTrain, but doesn't include Calgary's and Edmonton's Light Rail Systems.

We will have to see if the O-Train makes the cut once it opens, but by definition, it should. 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Phil said:

The list includes as metros the Toronto Subway, the Montréal Métro, and the Vancouver SkyTrain, but doesn't include Calgary's and Edmonton's Light Rail Systems.

We will have to see if the O-Train makes the cut once it opens, but by definition, it should. 

 

 

Both Calgary and Edmonton have at grade crossings through their systems (and Calgary is even on street, though on a transit mall, through downtown), Ottawa's is entirely grade separated. And there have been a lot of people already calling it a light metro instead of just simply LRT>

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Personally, my definition of metro vs LRT vs Light Metro is really based on the type of vehicle, as metro generally implies heavy rail vehicle. I still think the Confederation Line counts as a LRT since it is not heavy rail vehicles, but a lot closer to metro than a tramway or basic LRT system, like Waterloo.

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18 hours ago, DavidBellerive said:

Personally, my definition of metro vs LRT vs Light Metro is really based on the type of vehicle, as metro generally implies heavy rail vehicle. I still think the Confederation Line counts as a LRT since it is not heavy rail vehicles, but a lot closer to metro than a tramway or basic LRT system, like Waterloo.

And that's why a lot of people have been saying LIGHT metro. Meaning that's it's a metro like system, but uses light rail tech.

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4 hours ago, corynv said:

And that's why a lot of people have been saying LIGHT metro. Meaning that's it's a metro like system, but uses light rail tech.

All these nuances are explained in the Wikipedia article I initially mentioned.

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I too prefer Metro over LRT or Light Rail.

Technically, as the vehicles on the Confederation Line are typically looked at in the same class as the Bombardier Flexity, which as we know are used as Streetcars in Toronto, one could easily see them as being the same thing in Ottawa.

I guess it really boils down to not just the vehicles but the line itself and how it is setup and operated. 

In Toronto, the TTC Streetcars are operating right on the busy streets, and contend with every traffic light, intersection, cars and more. It is similar to bus service on city streets, but with a heavier and higher capacity vehicle, that tends to ride much smoother.

In Ottawa, the Confederation Line O-Train uses similar type of vehicles in many ways, however it operates on a dedicated and segregated right of way, independent of surface traffic and circulation. It also runs at significantly higher speeds than the TTC Streetcars could ever operate. The stations are massive and handle very high levels of passengers, often to crush levels.

In comparing to Montreal's Metro, the vehicles are both narrower than the TTC Subway, but handle extremely high passenger numbers, travel between stations and have dedicated guideways.

What I suppose I am trying to say is it doesn't matter the vehicle, and it doesn't matter the name, how it is operated and designed as a system is what it really comes down to. Our system is a high capacity rapid transit cross-city service. To me that's a metro, more so than those light rail lines you see overseas.

Plus in comparing Montreal Metro to Toronto Subway, the metro has more style, and better looks, than the boxy stainless steel riveted subway cars.

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1 hour ago, Shane said:

I too prefer Metro over LRT or Light Rail.

Technically, as the vehicles on the Confederation Line are typically looked at in the same class as the Bombardier Flexity, which as we know are used as Streetcars in Toronto, one could easily see them as being the same thing in Ottawa.

I guess it really boils down to not just the vehicles but the line itself and how it is setup and operated. 

In Toronto, the TTC Streetcars are operating right on the busy streets, and contend with every traffic light, intersection, cars and more. It is similar to bus service on city streets, but with a heavier and higher capacity vehicle, that tends to ride much smoother.

In Ottawa, the Confederation Line O-Train uses similar type of vehicles in many ways, however it operates on a dedicated and segregated right of way, independent of surface traffic and circulation. It also runs at significantly higher speeds than the TTC Streetcars could ever operate. The stations are massive and handle very high levels of passengers, often to crush levels.

In comparing to Montreal's Metro, the vehicles are both narrower than the TTC Subway, but handle extremely high passenger numbers, travel between stations and have dedicated guideways.

What I suppose I am trying to say is it doesn't matter the vehicle, and it doesn't matter the name, how it is operated and designed as a system is what it really comes down to. Our system is a high capacity rapid transit cross-city service. To me that's a metro, more so than those light rail lines you see overseas.

Plus in comparing Montreal Metro to Toronto Subway, the metro has more style, and better looks, than the boxy stainless steel riveted subway cars.

Toronto streetcar uses Bombardier Flexity OUTLOOK wich is the Tram variant of the Flexity FREEDOM. I don't understand why people compare Citadis Spirit trains with Bombardier Flexity Freedom trains. Citadis trains are longer with bigger modules, they use 1500V DC (witch is a mainline train power supply) instead of 750V DC and they are faster. If we need to compare Citadis Spirit trains it would be with Edmonton/Calgary Siemens vehicules the only difference being that one is low floor and the others high floor. 
Our network is technicaly a ''Light Metro'' system since we use LRT like vehicules, comparable to Rotterdam Metro, Frankfurt U-Bahn or Edmonton LRT

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